Weddings in Florence

Why couples choose to marry in Florence

       A quick look at wedding statistics for 2011 shows Florence is the city of choice for couples who wish to marry in Italy. Marriage in Florence has now become a celebration of taste, art and excellence, but why? One of the reasons is the unique quality of the photographs that the warm light of Florence gives, another, the splendor of its art and architecture and the ability of its artisans, to combine these ingredients to produce an album of photographs worthy of those artists who made the art of Florence a household name.

       One of the most photographed squares by couples is Piazzale Michelangelo, this view embraces the heart of the City from Forte Belvedere to the Cathedral Santa Croce, it follows the Arno, the bridges including Ponte Vecchio, the Duomo, the Campanile di Giotto not to forget the hills that spread like a carpet towards the horizon. Whenever I pass Piazzale Michelangelo, groups of newly weds, friends and family are busy posing for photographs and these albums will become the most treasured possession of the family. But the business of putting a beautiful album together, is not only Italian.

       Whenever I passed the Statue of “Il cavaliere di Bronzo” dear to the heart of Puskin (in Russian: Медный всадник) a vast monument to the memory of Peter the Great, clusters of newly weds, notwithstanding the autumn mists went to great pains to produce photographs that would long outlive even this great day. Seeing these activities around “Il cavaliere di Bronzo” is a memory of San Pietroburgo that will last with me forever, as well as the variety of Palaces, convents, the Winter Palace, and Carskoe Selo and some of the work done by Francesco Bartolomeo Rastrelli born in Florence.

       After the pictures on Piazzale Michelangelo some couples also add a short film, perhaps a visit to their favourite place along the Arno or a visit to the countryside, or cities like Siena or San Gimignano. Some like a special stop at the corner of Ponte Santa Trinita, made famous by Dante, when he first saw Beatrice in 1275. Others choose the much loved Italian Garden of Boboli. This is a beautiful example of an open air-museum. Palazzo Pitti and its gardens are well documented for their splendour and beauty. Even in 1585 the Japanese ambassador Hasekura Tsunenaga remained bewitched by the palace and its surroundings while his host remained fascinated by the splendour of his attire and those of his attendants.